Scottish prose of the seventeenth & eighteenth centuries
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Scottish prose of the seventeenth & eighteenth centuries being a course of lectures delivered in the University of Glasgow in 1912 by John Hepburn Millar

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Published by James Maclehose and sons, publishers to the university in Glasgow .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Scottish prose literature -- History and criticism,
  • English prose literature -- Scottish authors -- History and criticism

Book details:

Edition Notes

Statementby John Hepburn Millar, M.A. professor of constitutional law and constitutional history in the Universi of Edinburgh; lecturer in Scottish literature in the University of Glasgow, 1911-12; author of "A literary history of Scotland."
SeriesLibrary of English literature -- LEL 11839.
The Physical Object
FormatMicroform
Paginationvi, [5], 272, [1] p.
Number of Pages272
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL13563283M
OCLC/WorldCa8740249

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  Scottish prose of the seventeenth & eighteenth centuries. Being a course of lectures delivered in the University of Glasgow in by Millar, John Hepburn. texts All Books All Texts latest This Just In Smithsonian Libraries FEDLINK (US) Genealogy Lincoln Collection. National Emergency Full text of "Scottish prose of the seventeenth & eighteenth centuries". Scottish Prose of 17th and 18th Centuries 89 Scottish Prose of 17th and 18th Centuries 89 (' the mungerall burluesque poet,' as he is called by ' Edinburgh Citizen' in ) would have made an end of Scottish prose if it had not been. The late eighteenth century witnessed an explosion of intellectual activity in Scotland by such luminaries as David Hume, Adam Smith, Hugh Blair, William Robertson, Adam Ferguson, James Boswell, and Robert Burns. And the books written by these seminal thinkers made a significant mark during their time in almost every field of polite literature and higher learning throughout Britain, Europe.

As the 17th and 18th centuries progressed, the latter style would become more intimately associated with explicitly ‘Scottish’ literature, but the former style also had a less obvious but nevertheless lasting influence. The origins of the two styles – baroque and plain – precede the 17th century.   Between the early 18th century and the 20th-century Scots renaissance led by MacDiarmid, the union was invisible precisely because it was such an unquestioned and largely uncontroversial part of. Until improved methods of agriculture were introduced in the 18th century, most domestic animals were killed off after the summer's grazing and their meat preserved for the winter months by salting, smoking, burying and freezing and other methods. These all appear in Scottish recipe books. Scottish literature in the eighteenth century is literature written in Scotland or by Scottish writers in the eighteenth century. It includes literature written in English, Scottish Gaelic and Scots, in forms including poetry, drama and novels. After the Union in Scottish literature developed a .

The 17th century. This period was the high point of Scottish Gaelic literature. The political, ecclesiastical, and social structures of Scotland were changing as was the relationship between the central government and the Gaelic area. Enough Gaelic poetry survives to show that there were many poets of great talent.   REGINALD PEACOCK () is one of the important prose writers of the 15th century. Peacock’s prose, often rugged and obscure, is marked by his preference for English words over Latin. His two works were The Repressor of over-much Blaming of Author: English Notes. After Burns’s death, in , Walter Scott became, arguably, the most prominent Scottish writer of the first half of the 19th century. Scott wrote poetry and prose in English, but his works are suffused with Scots dialogue and often engaged with Scotland’s history and future. Scottish prose of the seventeenth & eighteenth centuries. Being a course of lectures delivered in the University of Glasgow in